Tempting Danger by Eileen Wilks

Tempting Danger by Eileen WilksTempting Danger by Eileen Wilks
Narrator: Full Cast
Series: World of the Lupi #1
Published by GraphicAudio on 6/1/2013
Genres: Romance, Urban Fantasy

 

Book: B
Performance: B

The Plot:

A bold new world where the magical and mundane co-exist in an uneasy alliance–and a cop balanced on her own knife-edged struggle is their only hope against a cold-blooded killer.

Lily Yu is a San Diego police detective investigating a series of grisly murders that appear to be the work of a werewolf. To hunt down the killer, she must infiltrate the clans. Only one man can help her–a were named Rule Turner, a prince of the lupi, whose charismatic presence disturbs Lily. Rule has his own reasons for helping the investigation–reasons he doesn’t want to share with Lily. Logic and honor demand she keep her distance, but the attraction between them is immediate and devastating-and beyond human reason. Now, in a race to fend off evil, Lily finds herself in uncharted territory, tested as never before, and at her back a man who she’s not sure she can trust.

This review contains spoilers only to the extent of what you would find if you read the blurbs for the next books in the series.

My Thoughts:

Listening to this graphic audio production was something of an experiment for me: in the past I’ve stayed away from any and all full-cast productions – especially those with sound-effects – because I dislike them…except, it would seem, for when I don’t. *sheepish look*

Tempting Danger by Eileen Wilks was a book I had read before and I enjoy the World of the Lupi series. It’s one of the few series I read whose main couple are married for most of the books and, like J.D. Robb’s Eve and Roarke, the conflict that drives the stories is primarily external with a nice splash of realistic relationship issues here and there. Re-listening to Lily’s introduction to Rule over the murder investigation that kicks off the story was almost like experiencing the book for the first time because of the style of the production.

One of the things I like about the world that Wilks has created is that even after working my way through a glutted market of Urban Fantasy and Paranormal books containing werewolves and demons and their own mythology, it still manages to seem fresh. Part of that is because the books have a solid real-world feel in terms of the dynamics of character relationships, Lily’s police job and the procedural elements in play, and the political machinations that take place and when the more fantastic elements are layered over that foundation, it makes for solid and relatable world-building. This series also manages to take my least favorite PNR thematic element – fated mates – and make it not just palatable but an integral and enjoyable part of the series. It helps that the characters act rationally about it and there’s no “I must treat you badly because I can’t resist you” dynamic in play.

Structurally, the murder mystery is the primary focal point although Rule and Lily’s growing relationship adds a nice romantic element as well. Between the two primary protagonists, we get alternating views and I really like that split perspective. The peripheral characters are very well drawn and one of the areas in which Wilks excels in this series is integrating a large cast of characters and seamlessly weaving in multiple story-lines without confusing the reader.

The prejudice the lupi experience and the ways in which that complicates Lily’s investigation, the lupi hierarchy, family conflicts between Rule and his brothers and father, the resentment Lily experiences from some of her fellow police officers, the spiritual divide between Lily and Rule, the construct of magic systems and who has which abilities… there were just a lot of elements that blended together nicely to make this well-rounded story and I recommend it.

The Performance:

My initial thought was that the casting for this audiobook was excellent and while that is undoubtedly true, the vocal skills of each voice actor were uniformly strong, so credit where credit’s due. From the perspective of getting to hear realistic dialogue, well-delivered emotional content, and strong performances, I was entirely pleased. I did have to adjust to Lily’s voice. Her character was delivered well but it just wasn’t what I was expecting. Her voice was strong, tough, and typically West/Mid-west in inflection and intonation and I think I was expecting her Chinese mother and grandmother to have had more influence on her inflections. I don’t have any text-based reason for the disconnect, just my mental expectations as a reader. Rule, Cullen, Lily’s grandmother…well, the rest of the cast, really, completely met my expectations vocally.

There’s a pretty broad cast of characters who get more page time than might be expected and the full-cast production works well to highlight that. That’s definitely one thing a full-cast production has going for it: the ability to present the listener with perfect voices regardless of age, gender, background, etc. I’ll still never like music underlying the voices in my audiobooks and during kissing scenes the heavy breathing was little loud and the smacking sounds were annoying (if I never again hear the sound effect of someone slurping coffee, it will be too soon) but those ended up being minor quibbles because I enjoyed this production to a surprising degree and immediately moved on to the second one.

I was intrigued by several aspects of the production. I don’t know that I would call it abridged so much as I would call it an adaptation. Having read the book, I had it on hand to compare to the performance and while certain things were omitted, it was more along the lines of descriptions of things that were given voice through sound effects. I was more surprised by the way dialogue was altered slightly with similar wording inserted in place of what was actually written – almost as a person might accidentally do while reading aloud. The story remains wholly intact, though.

Overall an enjoyable audiobook that, if you’re like me and tend to avoid audio dramas, just might change your mind on that. One thing that really assisted me in making a decision about whether or not to buy this audio was the fact that GraphicAudio has an extended sample available on SoundCloud so I’m linking to it here: