Snow White Must Die by Nele Neuhaus

Snow White Must Die by Nele NeuhausSnow White Must Die by Nele Neuhaus
Narrator: Robert Fass
Series: Bodenstein & Kirchoff #4
Published by AudioGO Ltd. on 1/15/13
Genres: Mystery
Source: Audiobook Jukebox
two-half-stars

Story: C
Narration: B+

The Plot:

Tobias Sartorius was sent to prison for the murder of two girls the summer after he graduated from high school. The case against him was circumstantial since the bodies were never found. After ten years he’s been released and returns to his hometown to find his childhood home in disarray, his father’s restaurant shut down, his parents divorced, and he and his family facing boundless hostility from the townsfolk in Altenhain. When his mother is assaulted and a body is found soon after his return and then another girl goes missing, the horrible events from his past are stirred up into a toxic brew.

Called in to investigate the assault and the newly discovered remains, Detective Superintendent Oliver von Bodenstein and Detective Inspector Pia Kirchoff find themselves investigating both the past murder and the current disappearance. At the same time, they have to contend with inter-office strife in the Division of Violent Crimes at the Regional Criminal Unit in Hofheim as well as struggling with various issues in their personal lives.

My Thoughts:

This is a complex mystery story that relies on a multitude of characters as it winds a twisty path to a final whodunit revelation. I couldn’t shake the sense that I’d picked up a cozy mystery that had been thrown into a blender with a true-crime novel and mixed on high. I’d call it an anti-cozy except the in-depth involvement and accompanying portraits drawn of a large cast of villagers was oddly reminiscent of one, as was the “whodunit” nature of the story and the lack of gratuitous descriptions of violence. The amount of venality, anger, unlikable characters, and dysfunctional personal lives in the story pretty much took the “cozy” aspects to the mat for a body slam, however.

I was slow to warm to this book. I suspect there’s one big reason for that: the majority of my reading selections – especially in detective/mystery fiction – have trained me to focus on one or two primary protagonists and I had a hard time adjusting to the sheer number of detailed perspectives and lives in play. This novel has a large cast of characters and while there is something of a focus on Tobias and the police duo who are investigating the current-day crimes, the story branches out in what seemed like far too many tangential directions.

The police procedural aspects of the story made me expect a certain amount of straightforward presentation of detail but the majority of descriptions tended towards factual rather than atmospheric. This created a mental image of this story, the characters, and the environment that was very black and white rather than full-color and multi-dimensional and so my ability to firmly construct vibrant character sketches and connect to them was limited.

Without knowing what the directive was to the translator (i.e. how much leeway he had to make phrases seem more natural to an English-speaking audience) it almost feels unfair to nit-pick but while the meaning of almost everything was clear, I had a few places where I had to make assumptions. Phrasing like a reference to a necklace found in the “milk room under the sink” and “But until today he’d had those black holes in his memory…” – implying his memory returned today when the context of the story actually indicates it should be “To this day he had those black holes in his memory” (indicating the persistence of his lack of memory) – made me pause. I also found it interesting that it wasn’t until I translated a phrase back into the German words I’m accustomed to seeing it in (Kinder, Küche, Kirche) that I understood the cultural implication/context of its use.

The mystery was engaging and I did enjoy the layer-by-layer reveal of motives and connections among the populace of Altenhain once I was grounded in the story and the cast. There are hints dropped throughout the book so it would benefit the listener to pay close attention. This is the fourth book in this series that follows Bodenstein and Kirchoff and although it worked as a stand-alone I got the sense that the events in the Regional Criminal Unit and in the personal lives of the detectives would have been easier to mentally organize (and would have generated more sympathy for the characters) had I started with the first book.

I found the ending frustrating and that had a noticeable impact on how I graded this one. After the basic outline of who/how had been worked out, there was an hour left in which some very unlikely plot twists took place. By that point there was no room in my brain for a couple of not-introduced-until-now names/people and I was just waiting for the end to make sure everything wrapped up. If you are a frequent consumer of mysteries and police procedurals though, I think there’s a lot in this one that will appeal to you.

The Narration:

The narration worked well and I would imagine that Robert Fass’ delivery will satisfy any listener. Characters were clearly differentiated although I would have found additional delineation/characterization through varied cadences and more character-specific emotional delivery to be beneficial. The narrative and character dialogue was, as I would expect in a translated work, delivered primarily in American accent. Proper nouns, however, were given their full German-accented pronunciation which I appreciated tremendously. Male/female vocal range separation was done well, the narrative voice was distinct, pacing was excellent, the delivery was smooth, and production was top-notch.

 

Thank you to AudioGO for providing me a copy of this audiobook for review purposes via the Solid Gold Reviewer program at www.audiobookjukebox.com
 
two-half-stars

Comments

  1. I have plans to get to Daughter of Smoke and Bone this summer glad to see such high rednmmencatioos. It was the commute that started my audiobook listening. I don’t have much of a commute anymore, but I still listen anytime I get in the car. Sometimes I just go out to the car and listen at lunch it gets me away from work and refreshes my mind. I can see why you don’t want to listen while hiking! Mountain lion yikes!

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