Bonds of Justice by Nalini Singh

Bonds of Justice by Nalini SinghBonds of Justice by Nalini Singh
Narrator: Angela Dawe
Series: Psy-Changeling #8
Published by Tantor Media on 9/20/11
Genres: Paranormal, Romance

Story: B+
Narration: B+

Sophia Russo is a J- Psy (Justice) who has the ability to pull memories from people and project them to others. Max Shannon is a New York cop with a high case solve rate and natural mental shields that make him impervious to Psy mental manipulation. The two have crossed paths before but when they are both assigned to assist Psy Councilor Nikita Duncan in tracking down a killer in her organization, they are forced to confront the attraction between them. Both have emerged from very difficult childhoods with scars but both have also developed a tremendous inner strength and as they learn to open up to one another I found myself completely drawn in to the developing relationship between the two. The romance is nicely woven between the dual investigations taking place and, perhaps because it is a Psy/Human pairing rather than Psy/Changeling, has a very different feel than previous books in this series.

The romance angle and the threats to Councilor Duncan are only a part of the story. There is also a serial killer who is toying with Sophia and Max as he taunts both them and the justice system with offers to reveal where he has buried his past victims. Also in the mix is Sophia’s degenerating psychic shields (common to J – Psy, who tend to burn out early and need frequent “rehabilitation”), the ongoing political upheaval in the Psy Council, and a minor story-line regarding Max’s brother.

This is book eight in the Psy/Changeling series and it was a turning point for me in a couple of different ways. My initial enjoyment of this series had started to fade by book six but book eight really renewed my interest and started developing more over-arching series plot points.  Having read the entire series in paperback, I went to the audiobooks for a “re-read” and found that even some of the books I didn’t like as well as others took on new life and new enjoyment in audio form. I loved the first two audiobooks and liked the third but I had some issues with pauses in the narration in books four through seven. With book eight, I think Angela Dawe turns in her best narration of the series. Of course, this happens to be my second favorite book in this series so that helps too.

This book is also where I came to really appreciate the way that Nalini Singh juggles multiple suspense story lines, the political sub-plots, the primary romance, hints for future plot lines, and catching us up (briefly) with characters from previous books. There is a very seamless flow to the story lines and they all pull together nicely. This book also gave me some needed insight into Nikita’s feelings towards Sascha and this was the first time Kaleb Krychek hit my radar as a possible lead character for a later book.

Max and Sophia’s primary focus is the case they are working and there is a bit less (which isn’t to imply it’s not prevalent still) romance/sex in this one. That worked to solve one issue that I noticed after listening to the audiobooks in such close temporal proximity to one another – there is quite a bit of repetition in the phrasing used during the sex scenes.

Since I listened to this book on vacation, I had a lot of time to consider the narration of this book, especially since there seems to be a very distinct division in opinion regarding that. Plus, lots of driving time with my brain in neutral leads to lengthy reviews so….

I have enjoyed the narration for this series but, in part, I chalked that up to a preference for (or at least not a dislike of) more subdued narration. With this book I started to analyze other reasons I might find the audiobooks so successful at delivering the story and as I listened to Bonds of Justice, I realized that to make the Psy interesting to listen to, they have to be given a blunted affect, not the blank affect they are described as having. It would provide too great a contrast if the non-Psy characters were given dramatic voices so structurally, the narration is pretty well thought out. In addition, as we catch up with Lucas and Sascha in little snippets in this book, the growing increase in emotion in Sascha’s voice is rather delightful to hear.

I also found myself interested to note another characteristic of Angela Dawe’s narration. I could invariably tell when the sentence following a spoken line of dialogue was going to refer to the character’s voice as husky, or strained, or generally altered in some manner because the voice that was delivered was so distinctive in that characteristic. I actually found myself mentally composing that descriptive sentence each time the line of dialogue was ending. That seems a no-brainer because shouldn’t all dialogue be delivered with textual accuracy?  But it was so very ear-catching in this series. I think this is a reflection not just of a very tight adherence to textual voice descriptions but the fact that all other dialogue was managed primarily through a narrower than anticipated range of modulation and a more steady cadence of speech than normal, which I suspect has the effect of leaving some listeners unmoved by the narration.

My only qualm with the narration of this book is that at times, I found myself confusing Max and Sophia’s voices at the start of quiet dialogue between the two. This is because Sophia is given a slightly husky voice in a lower register but I really liked her voice so my ability to be confused is a minor quibble.

This was a very good audiobook and on the whole, I would recommend the series (excluding Mine To Posses) in audio format for a first read or a re-read.

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